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I Built A Thing Today! (DIY Multi-Uke Stand)

 

That’s my mountain dulcimer taking up seat number 5… ūüôā

 

I saw several DIY PVC guitar racks being talked about online, and the one thing I noticed, besides that they’re ugly, is they really minimize the space they take up. We have 5 ukes, and a banjolele, though one uke is of the flying V body style so it won’t work in this, and while I have nice, pretty wooden stands, they take up quite a bit of space. And today I really wanted to build something, so here’s what I did.

Approximate Finished Dimensions

18″ high x 28″ wide x 16.5″ deep

Purchase List

  • 2 x 10′ 1/2″ PVC pipe ($4.16)
  • 14 1/2″ PVC pipe T fittings ($4.76)
  • 6 1/2″ PVC pipe caps ($1.38)
  • 11¬†1/2″ PVC pipe 90¬į elbows ($4.40)
  • pipe cutting tool ($7)
  • glue (optional and I only used to to glue the main sections together¬†in case I want to disassemble it in the futureand store it flat) ($6)

How to Prepare

You will need to do a lot of cutting. Here’s the breakdown of how many, how long. I only used 15′ of the pipe total.

  • 5 x 1.75″
  • 7¬†x 3″
  • 10 x 4″
  • 6¬†x 1″
  • 2 x 11″
  • 3 x 25.5″

How to Assemble

Top

  • Make the top bar with the neck guides by connecting these pieces in the following order:
  • Elbow + 1″ piece + T + 3″ piece +¬†+ T + 3″ piece +¬†+ T + 3″ piece +¬†+ T + 3″ piece +¬†+ T + 3″ piece +¬†+ T + 1″ piece + elbow.
  • Connect one 4″ piece into the open end of the T’s across (6 times). Then connect an elbow, and a 1.75″ piece to the first 5 of them. Add the 6 caps to all of the open ends. This completes your top bar.
  • On the downward facing open ends of the elbows, connect a 4″ piece of pipe. Attach a T to these so you can add the crossbar between them.
  • Place a 25.5″ piece into the open ends of the T where they face each other.
  • Connect a 11″ piece to the remaining open ends of the T’s, going downward. These will connect into the base.

Bottom

  • Create a rectangle, using 4 T’s, 2 4″ pieces, and the two remaining 25.5″ pieces. This will form the part of the base that the ukes will rest on.
  • Choose a side to be the back of the stand. Attach a 1″ piece to each open T side, and add another T, this one facing upwards. Your top section will fit into this.
  • Connect the remaining 3″ pieces to the backs of these T’s, then add 2 of the elbows, pointing down.
  • Finish the front of the stand by connecting the last 2 1″ pieces, and then the elbows.

Finishing

  • Fit the top into the bottom. Make sure everything fits. Try it out. Tiny ukes, like a soprano, will barely¬†reach the top bar, and if you have a sopranino, you’ll need to place the secondary bar lower. If everything looks good, you can glue things together now.

Let me know if this worked for you, or if I made any mistakes in the parts list! Happy making!

Distractions

So if you visit often, you’ll see I haven’t made a blog post here in a while, nor have I added any new shop items. I’ve been distracted from my work as a crafter by my music practice. Not only am I still practicing my ukulele (and now I have 4 of them + a banjolele), and my mountain dulcimer (though not as often), I took the plunge and got myself a violin and took my first lesson on it on Friday.¬†I was worried about how the lesson would go but my teacher was great, and sent me home with some homework. I see her again in 2 weeks and I can’t wait!

I’ve always loved violin/fiddle music and really wanted to learn to play but was afraid to try because all I kept hearing is how hard it is. But my time with my ukes has given me some confidence now that I can almost play a few songs and I decided to go for it.

So if its “quiet” over here, its because I’m practicing!

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ukulele gig bag

Knitted Ukuele Gig Bag

As some of you might know, I have two ukuleles. A tenor, and a concert. I have a soft sided gig bag that came with the tenor, but my concert has no such bag to protect her while travelling. I decided to knit and felt the Hana Hou! gig bag pattern and make my own.

Unfortunately it didn’t go exactly to plan, and the bag fits my tenor better than my concert, but its super thick and padded and will probably protect either of them better than my other bag does.

ukulele gig bag

This was before I felted it- as you can see, its freaking huge! Almost double the size it needs to end up.

After 4 cycles in a hot water/heavy agitation wash, it wad down to this size and not getting any smaller.

ukulele gig bag

Please ignore my dirty feet. Being barefoot is awesome!

ukulele gig bag

This is it inside out. I made a simple fabric lining, hand stitched in place, and velcro will secure the flap tucked in to the bottom to keep and uke from falling out.

And finally, hanging out with my concert uke inside. Its a little big for it, but I’m pretty happy with how it turned out. I would definitely consider making this again, though I would have more fun with the colorwork.

ukulele gig bag

You can see details here.

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New Ukulele (from a DIY Kit!)

I know, do I need a new ukulele when technically I can’t play the one I have yet? Probably not, but when I saw this DIY kit I had to order it. Its not full on build it yourself- the uke body is already together and really you just pin/glue/screw a few pieces in place and bob’s yer uncle. It took about 30 minutes to assemble and another twn minutes to string and tune, once I realized I had done some of the assembly wrong.

Anyway, I started out with a nice plain paint job and it quickly turned into this.

ukefront ukeside ukeback

It’s loud, but honestly it doesn’t sound as nice as my tenor does. There’s a big difference in price though between them, and quality. But it was still a super fun little project and I’d say worth the $40! Looks like I’ll have to build a new ukulele stand too!

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A Stand for my Ukulele!

So back about 6 months ago, I was super excited to purchase and hopefully learn to play the ukulele. I bought one, 32cef64cloved it, but wasn’t so great about practicing. Then a few weeks back, I joined Ukulele Underground¬†and I found this.

Plans to build your own ukulele stand, this one already sized perfectly for a tenor uke, which is what I have.

All I needed was a piece of wood for the base, a 1″ thick wooden dowel at least 22″ long, some felt, some screws, and some metal hooks sold at Walmart to act as the brackets.

I was super tight on money but really wanted to do this, so I improvised a bit. The wooden plaque I bought from Michael’s, with a 50% off coupon for $1.90. The felt I already had on hand, thanks to getting sent the wrong item when I ordered fabric ages ago. Wood stain and E6000 I had on hand. The dowel was the most expensive piece at about $4.50 for a 48″ length, and the screws were about a dollar for a package of 8. The hooks/brackets I made myself out of polymer clay, then cast them in resin which I dyed a deep red color with some mica powder.

Not counting the cost of materials I already had on hand, I spent about $8 building this.

Its Learn Ukulele Time!

I know this post is completely off topic for this blog, but I’m sharing it because you guys, my wonderful supporters, helped me get my ukulele, and UKULELE is still my coupon code thru the end of the year to get 20% off of anything and everything in my shop.

I’ve been playing for about three weeks now, starting from knowing absolutely nothing and having never so much as plucking a string on one. I watched a few YouTube videos to get an idea of how to strum it, and I looked up chords and some tabs on this site, Ukuguides.com.

Using the tabs section on the Ukuguides site, I found three chords that sound well together to start with and I’ve been practicing those until I get them right. I’m okay at them, but nowhere near perfect, and I have along way to go.

September 26th (C, F, G7)

Clicking the link above will let you download the approximately one minute long sound clip and you can play it in your media player.

My C chord has come along nicely and my G7 is okay, but my F chord needs a lot of help- I’m muting the A string by accident when I play it most of the time. Anyway, I’ll be recording myself at least once a week to get a feel for how I’m doing and to map my progress!