That’s my mountain dulcimer taking up seat number 5… ūüôā

 

I saw several DIY PVC guitar racks being talked about online, and the one thing I noticed, besides that they’re ugly, is they really minimize the space they take up. We have 5 ukes, and a banjolele, though one uke is of the flying V body style so it won’t work in this, and while I have nice, pretty wooden stands, they take up quite a bit of space. And today I really wanted to build something, so here’s what I did.

Approximate Finished Dimensions

18″ high x 28″ wide x 16.5″ deep

Purchase List

  • 2 x 10′ 1/2″ PVC pipe ($4.16)
  • 14 1/2″ PVC pipe T fittings ($4.76)
  • 6 1/2″ PVC pipe caps ($1.38)
  • 11¬†1/2″ PVC pipe 90¬į elbows ($4.40)
  • pipe cutting tool ($7)
  • glue (optional and I only used to to glue the main sections together¬†in case I want to disassemble it in the futureand store it flat) ($6)

How to Prepare

You will need to do a lot of cutting. Here’s the breakdown of how many, how long. I only used 15′ of the pipe total.

  • 5 x 1.75″
  • 7¬†x 3″
  • 10 x 4″
  • 6¬†x 1″
  • 2 x 11″
  • 3 x 25.5″

How to Assemble

Top

  • Make the top bar with the neck guides by connecting these pieces in the following order:
  • Elbow + 1″ piece + T + 3″ piece +¬†+ T + 3″ piece +¬†+ T + 3″ piece +¬†+ T + 3″ piece +¬†+ T + 3″ piece +¬†+ T + 1″ piece + elbow.
  • Connect one 4″ piece into the open end of the T’s across (6 times). Then connect an elbow, and a 1.75″ piece to the first 5 of them. Add the 6 caps to all of the open ends. This completes your top bar.
  • On the downward facing open ends of the elbows, connect a 4″ piece of pipe. Attach a T to these so you can add the crossbar between them.
  • Place a 25.5″ piece into the open ends of the T where they face each other.
  • Connect a 11″ piece to the remaining open ends of the T’s, going downward. These will connect into the base.

Bottom

  • Create a rectangle, using 4 T’s, 2 4″ pieces, and the two remaining 25.5″ pieces. This will form the part of the base that the ukes will rest on.
  • Choose a side to be the back of the stand. Attach a 1″ piece to each open T side, and add another T, this one facing upwards. Your top section will fit into this.
  • Connect the remaining 3″ pieces to the backs of these T’s, then add 2 of the elbows, pointing down.
  • Finish the front of the stand by connecting the last 2 1″ pieces, and then the elbows.

Finishing

  • Fit the top into the bottom. Make sure everything fits. Try it out. Tiny ukes, like a soprano, will barely¬†reach the top bar, and if you have a sopranino, you’ll need to place the secondary bar lower. If everything looks good, you can glue things together now.

Let me know if this worked for you, or if I made any mistakes in the parts list! Happy making!

I was struck by an idea this evening for a simple way to display the necklaces I’ve made for my shop rather then just having them all stuffed into a drawer. My solution? It cost me $5 and about 15 minutes.

Remember my bench rebuilding project? I had a piece of wood left over from that that was 34″ long- which was only 2″ shorter than I initially planned on, and sawing wood down to smaller pieces with a hand saw sucks, so I went with it like it was instead of cutting a larger piece down.

Then I popped over to Lowe’s, bought a package of screws (I only needed 2) to mount the board to the wall, and spent another $3.58 on a package of 40 7/8″ rounded, semi-circular screw hooks. I drilled a hole near each end for the mounting screws, and one hold down the middle every 1.5″ to screw a hook into. Remember when drilling your pilot holes to make them a size smaller in the wood then the actual screw is.

Then I screwed it into the wall and hung up all the necklaces! Easy, and fast! You could of course paint or stain the wood (I might spray it white later on) but I just put it up as is.

My boyfriend and I have this old wood and iron bench in the backyard, that after about 11 years, has all but rotted away. I decided to replace the wood in the old bench so people can safely sit on it again- and the timing was great because we are hosting a BBQ in a few weeks.

I went to Lowe’s and purchased 4 pieces of wood which I had them cut down to size for $7 and change total. I also spent about $2.50 on two packages of screws, which I used about 2/3s of.

IMG_20160504_193400I did have to cut the two smallest pieces of wood vertically with a handsaw after I got them home but that was simple enough.

The first step to rebuilding the bench was to take it apart. I don’t have access to a jigsaw, so I had to reuse the top piece of wood from the bench but that piece doesn’t get a lot of stress compared to say the seat.

IMG_20160505_103231 After staining the wood I bought, bolting and screwing things back into place was pretty simple, and we have a bench that can safely be sat on by us or our guests at our upcoming BBQ.

IMG_20160505_140717

So back about 6 months ago, I was super excited to purchase and hopefully learn to play the ukulele. I bought one, 32cef64cloved it, but wasn’t so great about practicing. Then a few weeks back, I joined Ukulele Underground¬†and I found this.

Plans to build your own ukulele stand, this one already sized perfectly for a tenor uke, which is what I have.

All I needed was a piece of wood for the base, a 1″ thick wooden dowel at least 22″ long, some felt, some screws, and some metal hooks sold at Walmart to act as the brackets.

I was super tight on money but really wanted to do this, so I improvised a bit. The wooden plaque I bought from Michael’s, with a 50% off coupon for $1.90. The felt I already had on hand, thanks to getting sent the wrong item when I ordered fabric ages ago. Wood stain and E6000 I had on hand. The dowel was the most expensive piece at about $4.50 for a 48″ length, and the screws were about a dollar for a package of 8. The hooks/brackets I made myself out of polymer clay, then cast them in resin which I dyed a deep red color with some mica powder.

Not counting the cost of materials I already had on hand, I spent about $8 building this.