I went by one of my favorite thrift stores yesterday morning because I wanted to check out something I thought I saw the day before. What was I after? This. An almost 8 pound bag of buttons! For anyone unfamiliar, typically buttons are purchased on a card with somewhere between 2 and 8 buttons to a card depending on size. A card can cost anywhere from $2 to $6 retail. There are literally thousands of buttons in this bag. I paid $28.33 after tax for it. If there are 2,000 buttons in the bag, I paid $0.014 per button. That’s a steal! I’ve been working on sorting them the last day or so and wow it is slow going! On the left are the colored ones, plus the black shanked buttons and the ones made out of shell. In the middle are all browns and metal ones. And on the right are black ones, and the whitish ones. Most of them are divided further by size, unless I only have enough of that color family to fill one spot. I’m nowhere near done sorting them, but I’m going to keep going until I fill up all three containers and thenRead the rest…

Saturday night Mattie and I were at friends’ and I was chatting with my friend Tracy via messenger. Tracy is a fellow crafter and all around brilliant creative mind. I’d say this conversation was divergent from the norm, but that would be a lie because all of our conversations go kind of like this. Me : I bought some novelty buttons today that look like bees. I’m not sure why. They should be here midweek. Tracy : Do you need bee buttons? Me : No, but maybe I can make a beehive hat? Lol Tracy : Beehive hat… Never thought you would be interested in something like that. Me : There is a hat pattern on ravelry.com called Wurm that I think in the right colors would look like an old cartoon style beehive with some small modifications. Tracy : Um…what occasions do you plan to wear this too? Me : Haha I have no idea. To the beekeepers convention? Tracy : You don’t keep bees. Lol Me : Um… Erm… I… Uh… I honestly have no good answer. Tracy : I think you are getting as bad as me. Lol Me : Craft daft? Tracy : Yes. And buy supplies with crazy ideas in mind for no good reason. I’m positive that we are not the only craftersRead the rest…

I’ve posted a few projects in the last few months that have had either lousy pics, or mentioned things without any pictures at all. This afternoon my new camera arrived, and I was able to get a few quick photos of some of the stuff you really did not get to see before, so here’s a quick photo dump. I’ll start with Simplicity 1612, View E, which was my prom party dress. I had posted photos from the party that the photographer took, but none of them really showcased my dress well. This dress turned out great except for some slightly wonkiness at the neckline, but that may have been caused by user error.   The back of this dress is fairly open, and ties at the neck. I had originally wanted to do the view with the twist back detail, but ended up falling in love with this one after seeing it sewn on another sewer’s blog.   One last shot. Look who needs to redo her nails! Whoops!   Here’s McCall’s 6173, View A. I’ve sewn these pants before but wanted one more pair of them because they are so freaking comfortable. I’m totally channeling my inner PegRead the rest…

McCall’s 5330 view A was one I cut back on September 5th, and I just tossed aside on my sewing table to get to “eventually.” One of the things I wanted to do over the next few weeks is get some serious sewing done. Yesterday I finished of my salvage project on the cherries skirt, and today was the day to finish M5330 view A. I believe this pattern originally called for belt loops, and it also only had facings, not a full lining. I chose to skip the facings, and add a lining, as well as leave off the (possible?) belt loops. I almost never wear belts, and the few I actually own are more for decoration rather than usefulness. I honestly have no idea how the construction went as per the directions. I’ve done a few patterns before where I added a full lining, and it basically amounts to sewing the garment twice, stitching the two sides together, leaving an opening for turning, turning, and then (for me) top stitching. The actual skirt only has three panels and a waistband- including the lining pieces, I had 7 pieces of fabric total, plus one piece of interfacing. With onlyRead the rest…